Shaking up People’s Trust

Shaking+up+People%27s+Trust

The biggest earthquake in Utah, since 1992, was on the morning of March 18th at 7:09 a.m. Its magnitude was rated a 5.7 on the Richter scale and the epicenter, the focal point of the earthquake, was in Magna. The probability of another earthquake coming is small, but aftershocks will still continue. Preparing for disasters before they happen is essential. 

When an aftershock or another earthquake hits, perform the drop, cover, and hold on method. Wherever you are, it is important to get underneath something sturdy. Make sure you can deflect falling debris and hold on to what you are taking cover under.

You might have heard you´re supposed to get under a doorway; however, you shouldn’t. According to the Earthquake Country Alliance, standing under doorways and running outside can be very dangerous. Stick to the drop, cover, and hold on method. 

If you are outdoors, stay outdoors. Do not go near any structures or potential objects that can fall over you. If you are driving, pull over and put your parking brake on. Try to not park by something that has a risk of falling, like a brick building or a light pole. 

Many people on the morning of the earthquake were in bed. If that’s the case in a future quake, turn onto your stomach and put your pillow on your neck and head.

During an earthquake, it’s imperative to stay away from falling debris. This can be bracing underneath something or staying away from objects that may fall. If you can’t protect your whole body, protect your head and neck first. Large debris isn’t always the problem, but sharp debris can cause injuries. In that case, you want something between you and what is falling. 

Everyone should have a plan on what to do if you are in an earthquake. You should have a plan of where to go if you are in your room, your living room, the kitchen, the bathroom, at work, etc.. It is important to have a plan. Your family should also have a plan.

You and your family should make a plan for what to do if you are in an earthquake. This should include where to meet if you are separated and can’t contact each other. This can be done on multiple levels: If you are in the house, meet all in one room. If you are all at work or school, have another location to meet at.

    According to Ready.gov, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s official website, making a supply kit beforehand is advised. This kit should have food and water that can last up to three days, with flashlights, a whistle, fire extinguisher, possible medication, charging equipment for phones and other devices, and extra batteries. If you have pets, make sure to include their food, leash, and/or possible medication. 

 Stay updated on local news and social media to ensure your safety. Lastly, make sure that the news source you use is accurate and don’t spread rumors. Stay safe Grizzlies!