Social Awareness Through Art

Back to Article
Back to Article

Social Awareness Through Art

Rachael Schafer, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Around the halls of Copper Hills, many may have noticed the human-sized sculptures made out of packing tape. Questions have flown around and not everyone is sure of their purpose or meaning. Mrs. Elice Taylor, Fine Arts teacher, had her Sculpting class make them in hopes that it would raise social awareness.

Each sculpture shows a different message or issue within our community. Taylor said, “Art has been used to create awareness for thousands of years. Even today you’ve got the political commentary comics in the paper or online. Most of them are just trying to bring attention or awareness to some topic.” Awareness comes in many forms, and this one comes in the form of packing tape sculptures.

To create these sculptures Mrs.Taylor had her students from her Sculpture class wrap packing tape around someone once with the sticky side out. Students then added 3 to 4 more layers around the person with the sticky side in. They then cut the tape off, and taped the figures back together. Taylor said that her goal in this assignment was first, to give students a fun assignment to do, and second to teach and allow her students how to use their voice and express themselves in different ways.

Students worked in groups and chose their social issue to focus on. Many and most of these situations affect students on a daily basis. Some of the issues displayed were about body image, bullying, and students’ lack of sleep and the negative effects. Taylor stated that doing these projects help her students be aware of the problems within our world today. Not only that, but she hopes that the CHHS population will take notice of the sculptures and take action relating to these issues.

One of the sculptures that was made by students was one called “Overlooked.” Taylor said, “…it was easy to just overlook the sculpture and for kids to abuse it and not pay attention to what it was. When you actually read the statement, it was to look around and make friends with those who don’t have friends.” Around us, though we may not notice this issue, there are students who struggle without friends, and that sculpture captured this moment and highlighted the issues of it. This sculpture was located in the main hall and is no longer there. Similarly, if we don’t notice students who are overlooked they too could disappear, not only from the school, but from the memories of students.

These messages need to be taken to heart, so as a student population Copper Hills can be made better, and in turn, the community will better for it. Students are the future generation and messages like these have the potential to make a lasting impact if they are listened to and followed up with action.